Planning A Blog

elisabethjohnson:

Some wise first steps to planning for blogging success, I thought. I also appreciated the points about images and connecting in the blogosphere. Now to put it all to practice… I’ve found quiet walks alone with nothing in my hands are good for regular brainstorming.

Originally posted on Live to Write - Write to Live:

edwardian-woman-reading-a-letter-lee-avison           I’ve been thinking about starting a blog of my own for some time. Now that the current draft of Ellen is on my agent’s desk for review, I’m finally ready to turn my attention to this task.

I have two goals for a blog.

The first is to write about place, a concept that has been fundamental to my life, a tug that pulled me to Vermont thirty years ago, and continues to inform my daily activities (chickens, garden, town politics) and most of my writing. My commentaries for Vermont Public Radio are all about life in Vermont, as are my editorials for the local papers. And all of my novels are set in Vermont. Into the Wilderness, published in 2010, earned a Gold Medal for Regional Fiction as well as recognition from the Vermont Library Association for its sense of place.

The second goal is to stay…

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Things I’ve learned in Texas

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1. The best thing to do with green peaches is peel, cut and toss them with olive oil, salt, sugar, pepper and chopped mint.
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2. The only thing you should be doing from 1pm-5pm is playing in water on the porch in your diaper under the fan.
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3. Best place to spy on novice ballerinas is Ballet Austin Saturday mornings downtown.
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4. It’s really hard and scary to take 4 children under 8 years old to a wall to wall candy store. Be ready to break large lollipops by accident and five finger/sample something like loose salt water taffy or bulk candy unintentionally.

Let’s Get Back to Real Interactions: Commenting vs. ‘Like’-ing on Facebook

Originally posted on Live to Write - Write to Live:

Of all the social media platforms, Facebook is the one I’m on the most. I can get drawn in by cute cat videos, spectacular b&w photography images, fun with puns, and the variety of posts my friends share.

I admit to being a bit heavy-handed when it comes to clicking the ‘Like’ button. I sign on, start scrolling through posts, when I see something, I like it, I click ‘Like’ to let folks know I was there, and move on.

But now that has changed.

The other day, a friend posted an interesting article that has led to this post.

The article is “I Quit Liking Things on Facebook for Two Weeks. Here’s How It Changed My View of Humanity.” I hope you’ll read through it.

FB_likeThe first item that jumped out at me was that each ‘Like’ becomes part of an algorithm that will throw certain posts in…

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