Let’s Get Back to Real Interactions: Commenting vs. ‘Like’-ing on Facebook

Originally posted on Live to Write - Write to Live:

Of all the social media platforms, Facebook is the one I’m on the most. I can get drawn in by cute cat videos, spectacular b&w photography images, fun with puns, and the variety of posts my friends share.

I admit to being a bit heavy-handed when it comes to clicking the ‘Like’ button. I sign on, start scrolling through posts, when I see something, I like it, I click ‘Like’ to let folks know I was there, and move on.

But now that has changed.

The other day, a friend posted an interesting article that has led to this post.

The article is “I Quit Liking Things on Facebook for Two Weeks. Here’s How It Changed My View of Humanity.” I hope you’ll read through it.

FB_likeThe first item that jumped out at me was that each ‘Like’ becomes part of an algorithm that will throw certain posts in…

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Bests when driving down the middle of the us

Quick food like corndogs and hamburgers: Culver’s

Truck stop fix: Love’s

Gas: QT

Swim, picnic, AND playground: Davis Park in Litchfield, Illinois

Coffee: Expresso in Litchfield, Illinois
(3$ medium iced coffee complete with extra espresso shot at no extra cost?! And delicious)

Local Craft Beer: q(resurrection pale ale)

Surprising roadside natural beauty: Missouri

Abandoned gas stations and propane tank cemeteries: Southern Oklahoma

Cornfields: Illinois

Cows: Texas

Wind farms: Michigan

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Writers, Time to get visual.

elisabethjohnson:

Thought this was a useful read for all the teacher bloggers out there + me! More Creative Commons tips + photo editing ideas.

Originally posted on Live to Write - Write to Live:

camera typewriterAs writers, we are – let’s face it – pretty obsessed with words. We get geeky about grammar, excited about syntax, and delirious over great dialog. We have strong opinions about the Oxford comma, have been known to swoon slightly over a perfect turn of phrase, and can debate the merits of different POVs for days.

You know who doesn’t do any of this? Normal human beings. Non-writers care very little about the nuances of language or the underlying structure of story. They are not concerned with finding le mot juste. They do not understand why anyone could agonize over a single sentence for hours. And, they often judge books by their covers.

Normal People do not succumb to the allure of words the way we do. Their attention is much more likely to be caught by an image than by a beautifully crafted sentence. Especially in this fast-moving, clickety-click…

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The face I have after a week in Kalamazoo on the road to Austin

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It’s not always easy to go home. My parents have been as welcoming as anyone could be to a mother of four who’s in between cities. I’ve enjoyed the Bell’s local brews, worked a couple days at the Water Street coffee house, played at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum (possibly one of the best childrens museums east of the Mississippi putting all boroughs’ children’s museums to shame, in my humble opinion), sipped ice tea on the patio, scratched a dozen mosquito bites after a night run with my dad, dashed through sprinklers, weeded the garden, staked the tomatoes, slept to the crickets, slurped palazzolo’s sorbetto, run around in the dry fountain at Bronson park, checked out library books…and still I’m ready to push on and push out. There’s something about coming home that’s welcoming and slightly suffocating no matter how old you are or how cool your parents might be.